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SYLVÈRE LOTRINGER — THE MAN WHO DISAPPEARED – Paris-LA
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SYLVÈRE LOTRINGER — THE MAN WHO DISAPPEARED

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A half-century after his death, Antonin Artaud remains at the center of a heated debate… [concerning] a number of questions, the main one being his attitude toward religion…

It is true that his thundering indictment of God and the Christian age have no equivalent in occidental culture; not even in Nietzsche’s work, which marked Artaud so profoundly. But it is equally undeniable that he fully returned to Christianity during his 1937 trip to Ireland and that he acted as a Christian convert before violently denying it again in 1945. — Sylvère Lotringer, 2003*

 

E-flux presents Remembering Sylvère Lotringer, which will include a screening of the theorist’s 2015 film THE MAN WHO DISAPPEARED—an imagining of “the ten days Artaud spent on the windswept Aran Islands prior to his descent into madness and deportation to France in a straitjacket.”

The evening will also bring “interventions” by Penny Arcade, Ames Hodges, and McKenzie Wark. See link below for details.

 

 

REMEMBERING SYLVÈRE LOTRINGER

THE MAN WHO DISAPPEARED screening

Tuesday, March 8, at 7 pm

E-flux Screening Room

172 Classon Avenue, Brooklyn

 

*Sylvère Lotringer, “I Talked About God with Antonin Artaud,” in Mad Like Artaud, translated by Joanna Spinks (Minneapolis: Univocal, 2015), 33, 34. Fous d’Artaud was published in 2003 by Sens & Tonka, Paris.

See “Electroconvulsive Lit: John Kelsey on Sylvère Lotriger’s Mad Like Artaud,” Texte zur Kunst 100 (December 2015).

 

 

From top: Sylvère Lotringer with producer Katherine Waugh and filmmaker Vivienne Dick on the clifftop of Dun Aengus on Inis Mór during the shoot of The Man Who Disappeared, May 5, 2013, Aran Islands, photograph by Amantine Dehan, courtesy of Katherine Waugh; Sylvère Lotringer, The Man Who Disappeared (2015), stills (2); Sylvère Lotringer in Los Angeles, 2015, photograph by Jonathan Thomas, courtesy and © the photographer; Sylvère Lotringer and Katherine Waugh on The Man Who Disappeared set, photograph courtesy of Waugh.

 

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