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Rebecca Hall is in town for a series of American Cinematheque screenings and conversations. PASSING—the actor’s directorial debut, based on the 1929 novel by Nella Larsen—will screen on Sunday in Santa Monica, followed by a conversation with Hall and Claudia

This weekend, GYOPO and USC present an afternoon devoted to a durational reading of DICTEE, the magnum opus by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha (1951–1982). The program will include a presentation of Cha’s artwork, introductory remarks by Yong Soon Min, Ellie

Filmgoers in New York and Los Angeles: Join Hamaguchi in conversation for post-screening Q & A's following his acclaimed new film DRIVE MY CAR.

Ser Serpas presents an exhibition of work at Balice Hertling’s rue des Gravilliers location, and a second show on rue Saint-Martin made up of unused objects from the first—as well as “15 framed pages of notes from Georgian language classes

When we fall in love we become different people, leaving old ways behind to face the unknown. Something like this happens to Lisa and Giorgi in Alexandre Koberidze’s WHAT DO WE SEE WHEN WE LOOK AT THE SKY?, an observational

In our season of anticipation and joy at the return of live theater, Dominique Morisseau’s PARADISE BLUE meets and exceeds audience expectations. Set at the end of the 1940s at the Paradise—a Detroit nightclub run by the temperamental trumpet player

Is it liquid? Lava? An oil-based churn? An evocation of the Middle Passage? Moving in endless waves of dark matter, Arthur Jafa’s new film AGHDRA—which premiered during his recent retrospective exhibition in Denmark—is now on view at the old Gavin

Chris McKim and producer Fenton Bailey will present two screenings of their documentary WOJNAROWICZ in New York, followed by Q & A's with the filmmakers.

On the occasion of the publication of PARIS LA 17—CHANGE AGENTS (2021–2022): An intermittent, open-ended, alphabetical Reading List, expanding on the artists, works, and concepts raised in the print issue.

Thoughts echoed around the world: “Most of what I love I love because Sylvère Lotringer first published it. RIP.” — Andrew Durbin. “Sylvère was not only a brilliant intellectual and a talented publisher, but also a sort of dowser, a